Bra Size Calculator

Check the measurement. The number on the tape measure is your true bust, but for fitting bras you need to round to the nearest even number. So if your bust is 33 1/2 inches, round up to 34 inches.

Not Helpful 3 Helpful Use a measuring stick when you need to measure the length of a rigid straight edge or line.

Note that in this instance, inches equals size so for example, if the measurement is 17 1/2 inches, you're a size 17 1/2 neck. For the best fit if you are between sizes, round up. To find your waist size, measure around the part of your waist where your pants normally sit. Keep the tape measure a bit loose, or put a finger between your.
Jun 09,  · First, mark the spot where the measuring tape lines up with the edge of the thing you're measuring. Find the nearest inch before this point. Then, find the nearest half-inch before this point. Then, the nearest quarter-inch, and so on. Add up your inches and fractions of inches until you have an accurate measurement%(98).
Make a line plot from these measurements (lengths of cockroaches, in inches, in Jake's collection): 1 1/4 1 1/8 1 1/8 1 1/2 1 1 1/8 1 3/8 1 3/4 1 3/8 7/8 1 1/4 2 1/8 1/2 1 1/4 1 1/4. 1 1/2 1 1/2 1 1/2 1 5/8. This time, you will need to do the scaling on the number line. b.
Check the measurement. The number on the tape measure is your true bust, but for fitting bras you need to round to the nearest even number. So if your bust is 33 1/2 inches, round up to 34 inches.
Jun 09,  · First, mark the spot where the measuring tape lines up with the edge of the thing you're measuring. Find the nearest inch before this point. Then, find the nearest half-inch before this point. Then, the nearest quarter-inch, and so on. Add up your inches and fractions of inches until you have an accurate measurement%(98).

Jun 09,  · First, mark the spot where the measuring tape lines up with the edge of the thing you're measuring. Find the nearest inch before this point. Then, find the nearest half-inch before this point. Then, the nearest quarter-inch, and so on. Add up your inches and fractions of inches until you have an accurate measurement%(98).

The inch is a standard unit of length in the imperial measurement system. You would usually measure inches using a measuring stick or measuring tape, but there are also ways to determine the number of inches using estimates and conversions. Measuring and Marking Tools. Tirar Medidas em Polegadas. Choose the best measuring tool for the task.

You'll need a tool that measures length in inches. The usual options would be a ruler, yardstick, or tape measure. Use a yardstick to measure objects that are longer than a feet 12 inches. Use a measuring stick when you need to measure the length of a rigid straight edge or line. Rulers are best for short distances. Yard sticks are better for slightly longer distances. Place the starting end of the measuring tool against one edge of the object you want to measure.

The starting edge of the measuring tool and the starting edge of the object should be perfectly aligned. Extend the measuring tool down the length being measured. Bring the measuring tool out along the length of the object you're measuring. Keep the tool parallel to this length the entire way down it. When using a measuring stick, the stick should lie flat against the edge or line being measured. Read the previous inch value. Locate the numbered value on the measuring tool that falls out immediately before the opposite end of the line, edge, or distance being measured.

This numbered value is the number of whole inches in length. The numbered values on a ruler, yardstick, or measuring tape all correspond to whole inches. Count the unnumbered lines past the previous inch value. Identify the unnumbered line on the measuring tool that lands at the exact end of the distance being measured.

Count the unnumbered lines in between the measured whole inch value and that final line, including the final line itself. You also need to count the number of unnumbered lines in between numbered values to determine the fraction. Add the fraction to the inch value. Add the fraction value you just counted onto the whole inch value you already measured. This should give you your final measurement. If the ruler has seven unnumbered lines in between numbered marks the inches are broken down into eighths.

Use the bigger marks between two inch markings for half-inches. A half-inch mark is always centered between any two one-inch marks. It almost always has the second-longest marking after the one-inch marks.

There will be one half-inch mark between each one-inch mark, but there are two half-inches per inch. Note that, starting with half-inch marks, not all lines may be labeled with numbers. In this case, you need to use the markings on either side to guide you. Use the smaller lines between half-inches for quarter-inches. After half-inches come quarter inches. These markings are smaller and sometimes skinnier than half-inches but usually bigger than the densely-packed marks around them.

They are evenly spaced between each half-inch mark and one inch-mark. There are four quarter-inches in one inch. Note that lines marking a quarter of an inch sometimes aren't any different in size from eighth-inch marks. In this case, keep in mind that two eighths of an inch make a quarter. Count to the second eighth-inch marking after the inch marking — this is the quarter-inch and the line in the same spot on the other side of the half-inch mark is the three-quarter inch.

Use the small, regular marks for one-eighth-inches. Smaller still than the quarter-inch markings are the one-eighth-inch markings. These markings are centered between the inch marking and the quarter-inch marking, the quarter-inch marking and the half-inch marking, and so on. There are eight one-eighth inches per inch. Use the tiny, densely-packed marks for sixteenths of an inch.

The shortest lines of all on most measuring tapes are the sixteenth-inch marks. There are 16 of these tiny marks per inch — four in each quarter-inch. Note that some very precise measuring tapes will mark down to one-thirty-second of an inch or even one-sixty-fourth of an inch! Use the same pattern for recognizing these miniscule measurements. Add the inch segments to determine total length. When you are measuring a length, getting an accurate value just means seeing where the tape lines up.

First, mark the spot where the measuring tape lines up with the edge of the thing you're measuring. Find the nearest inch before this point. Then, find the nearest half-inch before this point. Then, the nearest quarter-inch, and so on. Add up your inches and fractions of inches until you have an accurate measurement. This is a lot easier than it sounds — see below for an example. Let's say that we've measured past the one-inch mark, past one quarter-inch mark, and past one eighth-inch mark.

To find our measurement, we need to add: Since there are two eighth-inches in a quarter-inch, we can rewrite this as: If you need help, see our article on how to add fractions with unlike denominators.

Use the big, numbered markings for centimeters. On most metric measuring tapes, centimeters are the most prominent markings. Centimeters are usually labeled with large lines and, next to each line, a number. As with inches, the line marks each centimeter, not the number itself.

After each meter, the centimeter markings may start over again from zero or continue counting. This varies from measuring tape to measuring tape. Use the smaller markings between centimeters for 0. Some but not all metric measuring tapes will have medium-sized marks evenly spaced between each centimeter mark. These marks are usually not labelled with a number. The metric system is in base ten, which makes it much easier to work with decimals compared to imperial measurements.

For this reason, it's usually fine to refer to half-centimeter markings in decimal terms i. Use the small, densely-packed markings for millimeters. The small, tight, narrow lines between centimeter markings represent millimeters or one-tenth-centimeters. There are ten millimeters in a centimeter and, thus, one thousand in a meter. If your measuring tape doesn't have 0.

Add the centimeter segments to determine the total length. To measure with a metric measuring tape, first find the nearest centimeter before the distance you're measuring, then the nearest millimeter.

You can use a 0. Your measurement in centimeters will be a decimal where the tenths place is indicated by the millimeter marking. For example, see below: Let's say that we measure past the 33 centimeter mark to the sixth millimeter marking.

In this case, we can find our distance in centimeters like this: For example, let's say that we want the answer above in meters. In this case, since there are centimeters in one meter, we could use a conversion factor like this: Catch the hooked end on one side of the object you're measuring. If you're using a retractable tape measure the kind that comes in a small metal or plastic box that automatically sucks the tape back up when you're done with it note that the end of the tape will almost always have a small metal notch at the zero mark.

This is useful for holding the tape in the right place as you measure, so you may want to start by catching it on the edge of the object you're measuring. On that ruler find tick marks for these points: Math Mammoth Fractions 1.

Adding like fractions Equivalent fractions Adding unlike fractions 1 Adding unlike fractions 2: Finding the common denominator Adding mixed numbers Subtracting mixed numbers Subtracting mixed numbers 2 Measuring in inches Comparing fractions Simplifying fractions Multiply fractions by whole numbers Multiply fractions by fractions Multiplication and area Simplify before multiplying Dividing fractions by whole numbers Dividing fractions: The do's and don'ts of teaching problem solving in math Advice on how you can teach problem solving in elementary, middle, and high school math.

How to set up algebraic equations to match word problems Students often have problems setting up an equation for a word problem in algebra. This article explains some of those relationships. Seven reasons behind math anxiety and how to prevent it Mental math "mathemagic" with Arthur Benjamin video Keeping math skills sharp in the summer Geometric vanish puzzles Science resources Short reviews of the various science resources and curricula I have used with my own children.

The tick- marks are:. Fraction Lessons Understanding fractions Finding fractional parts with division Mixed numbers Fractions to mixed numbers and vv. Percents Lessons How to teach proportions Percent - the basic concept Percentage of a number—mental math How to calculate a percentage of a number How to calculate percentages Basics of percent of change.

The bust size is the loose circumference measured around the chest over the fullest part of the breasts, while standing straight with arms to the side, and wearing a properly fitted bra. The frame size is the firm circumference measured directly underneath the breasts. Check the measurement. The number on the tape measure is your true bust, but for fitting bras you need to round to the nearest even number. So if your bust is 33 1/2 inches, round up to 34 inches. Make a line plot from these measurements (lengths of cockroaches, in inches, in Jake's collection): 1 1/4 1 1/8 1 1/8 1 1/2 1 1 1/8 1 3/8 1 3/4 1 3/8 7/8 1 1/4 2 1/8 1/2 1 1/4 1 1/4. 1 1/2 1 1/2 1 1/2 1 5/8. This time, you will need to do the scaling on the number line. b.